Thursday, November 16, 2017

[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (November 16)



2008: Santa Ana winds blew from 11.15 to 11.19. 
Winds gusted over 70 mph in the Santa Ana Mountains and over 60 mph in the northern Inland Empire. 
The Freeway Complex Fire burned from Corona through Chino Hills and Yorba Linda. 
This fire destroyed or damaged over 300 homes and four businesses. 
More than 30,000 acres burned and more than 40,000 evacuated.

1994: Gusty winds whipped the Kern deserts. 
Gusts to 80 mph were clocked in Mojave, with sustained winds of 45 to 60 mph recorded. 
Power outages resulted.

1976: San Jose had a low temperature of 21° F -- a record for the month

1971: Poway Creek flooded Poway.

1964: It was 17° F in Palomar Mountain, the lowest temperature on record for November
This also occurred on this day in 1958 and on 11.29.1975.

1964: The coldest November high ever in Las Vegas, NV, 42° F.

1958: It was 17° F in Palomar Mountain, the lowest temperature on record for November
This also occurred on this day in 1964 and on 11/29/1975.

1951: Four day "Chinook" wind storm at Bakersfield began, lasting until the 19th. 
Longest such wind storm on record at the time. 
Highest sustained wind was 30 mph from the southeast.

1950: A series of winter storms lasting through the first week of December brought heavy precipitation to the Central Valley of California
Almost 700,000 acres were flooded with damage estimated at $33 million.


1909: The morning low temperature at Reno, NV, was 5° F.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, Las Vegas, & San Diego

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

[Geology2] [DISASTR-OUTREACH-LIB ] New USGS Uranium Information




Hi,

May be of interest: 

News release = USGS Estimates 40 Million Pounds of Potential Uranium Resources in Parts of Texas, New Mexico and Oklahoma

Fact Sheet = Assessment of undiscovered resources in calcrete uranium deposits, Southern High Plains region of Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma, 2017

New Uranium Mineral Named for USGS Scientist

USGS Uranium Resources Research: https://energy.usgs.gov/otherenergy/uranium.aspx


Uranium related research inquiries are my most frequently asked reference questions here in the Denver Library. Please, please feel free to contact me directly with additional tips and tricks to finding and using library materials, and(or) refer to my previous presentations and publications about uranium research and information (as well as radionuclide research and information) in rocks and water resources : 

October 2013 - Geoscience Information Society (Geological Society of America) Annual Meeting, Global Vision: Geoscience Information for the Future session: The Past is the Key to the Future: Uranium Research at the USGS Denver Library (https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2013AM/webprogram/Paper222073.html)  and Back to the Future: Uranium Information at the USGS Denver Library (https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2013AM/webprogram/Paper225430.html

Caine, J.S., Johnson, R.H., and Wild, E.C., 2012, Fault Zone Potential Conduit for Uranium Contamination: U.S. Geological Survey GeoHealth Newsletter, vol. 9, no. 2:  http://health.usgs.gov/geohealth/v09_n02.html#v09_n02_a14    

Caine, J.S., Johnson, R.H., and Wild, E.C., 2011, Review and interpretation of previous work and new data on the hydrogeology of the Schwartzwalder Uranium Mine and vicinity, Jefferson County, Colorado: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2011–1092, 55 p.


Enjoy the day,
Emily




Emily C. Wild
Librarian (Physical Scientist)
U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Library
Denver Federal Center
ph: (303) 236-1003
ecwild@usgs.gov

USGS Library: http://library.usgs.gov



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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>



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[californiadisasters] 2008 Freeway Complex, Wednesday, 15 November 2017



"2008 Freeway Complex" reminder
When
Wednesday, 15 November 2017
05:00 PM to 05:00 PM
(GMT) Greenwich Mean Time - Dublin / Edinburgh / Lisbon / London
Where
Orange County
Notes
At about this time in 2008 a fire began along the 91 (Riverside)Freeway in the bed of the Santa Ana River in Corona. Fanned by powerful Santa Ana Winds it pushed into parts of Yorba Linda, Anaheim Hills, Brea, Chino Hills, and Diamond Bar burning almost all of Chino Hills State Park. Later on that day a second fire would start in Brea and pushed by the strong Santa Ana Winds would jump the 57 (Orange) Freeway and eventually join up with the first fire to form the Freeway Complex. All told the Freeway Complex charred 30,305 acres and 314 residences were damaged or destroyed. This was the 4th largest fire in Orange County history.
From
californiadisasters   Calendar


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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

[californiadisasters] Magnitude 4.7 Earthquake Strikes in Monterey County



Magnitude 4.7 Earthquake Strikes in Monterey County

An earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 4.7 rocked Monterey County Monday morning, according to the USGS. 

The quake, which struck at 11:31 a.m., was centered about 13 miles northeast of the city of Gonzales, according to the USGS.

People in Bay Area cities such as San Jose, San Mateo, Alameda and San Francisco reported feeling shaking.

The USGS recorded at least five aftershocks of magnitude 2.5 or stronger in the area around the epicenter later Monday, the strongest registering 2.8 at 8:17 p.m.

Track the latest earthquake information using NBC Bay Area's quake map

Source: https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/M47M-earthquake-strikes-near-Gonzales-California-south-of-Salinas-457262443.html



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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] ‘Truly a miracle’: Cat missing for 10 years who survived Santa Rosa fire is finally back home



'Truly a miracle': Cat missing for 10 years who survived Santa Rosa fire is finally back home


November 13, 2017 10:50 AM

Source: http://www.sanluisobispo.com/news/state/california/article184359088.html


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] Will we be ‘wiped out?’ How climate change is affecting California



Will we be 'wiped out?' How climate change is affecting California

November 13, 2017 12:01 AM

The state used to have a fire season of a few summer months, he said. "Now, we are fighting fires virtually the entire year."

"The science is getting clearer and the extreme weather events are getting more frequent. All of that leads to more understanding, more clarity and then more action," Brown said on a panel in Bonn. "The only question is will human beings be able to react in time, or will we have to get such an extreme event that we get wiped out?"

Assembled scientists said lessening public health impacts must be central to policies that stabilize the temperature change below dangerous levels.

"That message affects everyone everywhere," said Dr. Maria Neira, director of public health and the environment at the World Health Organization.

Our summers will feel like Tucson if we don't make changes.

Kathleen Ave

Experts believe the health impacts of climate change will continue to be a focus across the Central Valley of California, where by the end of the century, annual summer temperature averages in the Sacramento region are projected to increase between nearly 4 degrees and 7 degrees Fahrenheit.

The area also is expected to experience an intense urban heat-island effect – which could make it seem 10 degrees hotter in urban areas than rural locales.

The number of extreme heat days, in which temperatures reach 101 degrees or more, is expected to increase from four days per year to 17 days by the middle of the century to 45 days by the end of the century, said Kathleen Ave, who heads up a local climate readiness collaborative. She believes that disseminating more information as it becomes available will give people a better sense of the various costs.

"Our summers will feel like Tucson if we don't make changes" like reducing greenhouse gas emissions, Ave said.

The six-county Capitol region already exceeds the state average in heat-related illnesses and deaths, according to the California Department of Public Health. For vulnerable populations – those with chronic diseases – the elevated heat levels put additional stress on the body.

Rising temperatures also affect air quality because chemical reactions that cause deterioration in air quality are temperature sensitive.

In Los Angeles, University of California scientists anticipate the number of days registering at 95 degrees or higher will increase to 22 by 2050, then to 54 by 2100. In the San Gabriel Valley, extreme heat days could go from 32 to 74 by 2050, and 117 by 2100.

Across the U.S., deaths from extreme heat and heat waves could double by 2050 in 21 cities.

California's climate of the future will still be Mediterranean: Rain in winter, heat in the summers. But the summers will be hotter, intensifying the summer drought and creating fuels more primed to burn.

Precipitation is coming more frequently as rain rather than snow, experts say. The snow that does fall is melting sooner, and will continue to shrink dramatically by the end of the century. This will have major implications for a state that relies on snowpack for water.

When the snow disappears, California will lose what for decades has acted as a natural storage system. Alex Hall, a UCLA professor whose research focuses on reducing uncertainties associated with climate change, said there is mounting evidence that the pattern of long droughts followed by big wet years will become more exaggerated.

"The past few years are a harbinger of what is to come," he said. "We had a blockbuster last year, by some measures the most precipitation in the historical record. And we had before that this very deep drought with unprecedented tree mortality."

The tree mortality crisis in the Southern Sierra is moving north; caused by warming and different invasive and noninvasive pine beetles.

As temperatures warm, there are fewer freeze days, which were nature's way of managing the beetle populations. Tree species that have developed to be drought-tolerant can shut down their photosynthesis process to manage the shortage and then open back up the next year when the drought has passed. But because the droughts have become longer, trees lack the necessary water, and die. Forests can also become a tinderbox for larger, hotter fires that sterilize the soil rather than the kinds of blazes that promote regeneration.

The fossil record indicates that species move when the climate undergoes dramatic changes. David Ackerly, a biologist at UC Berkeley, said a big challenge of 21st-century climate change is how rapidly the changes are taking place – faster than what scientists have ever seen.

"In broad strokes, we know that a lot of species can't move fast enough to keep up with projections, but what we know less about is what happens to them," Ackerly said. A warm spring can cause plants to leaf out early or flower early; then a late frost makes them more vulnerable.

Diversity is essential to the functioning of an ecosystem and can makes it more resilient in the face of adversities like drought. Ackerly contends there is something deeper at stake for the public.

"It's an ethical, aesthetic and even personal sense of loss that could be felt across society when we are no longer be able to hang onto a place," he said.

California is expected to see greater sea-level rise than the world average because of melting ice sheets.

In Mendocino, the rise is projected at between five and 24 inches by 2050, rising to between 17 and 66 inches by 2100. The melting ice in Antarctica will become a larger contributor to the rise than warming waters and melting mountain glaciers, one study found.

There are direct economic costs as well. UC Berkeley scientists released another study this summer that found the state's economy will lose billions of dollars a year to climate change. It concluded that warming will widen income gaps between rich and poor areas of the country because hotter places, where incomes are generally less, will suffer the worst consequences.

Brown believes it will take "big thinking" to reverse the climate impacts.

The warming temperatures are exposing the ways in which society is not planning sustainably, said Hall, the UCLA scientist.

Hall said adapting to the new reality could be more difficult for people in expansive California.

"We could just keep growing and keep developing and keep prospering," he said. "I certainly hope we can keep prospering, but I think we're going to have to think carefully about doing that in a sustainable way."

Source: http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article184244098.html


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] Santa Barbara marks ninth anniversary of destructive Tea Fire



Santa Barbara marks ninth anniversary of destructive Tea Fire

Many residents have yet to rebuild


SANTA BARBARA COUNTY, Calif. - This November 13 marks the ninth anniversary of the destructive Tea Fire in Santa Barbara County. 

The flames broke out at 6:30 p.m. in the hills above Westmont College back in 2008 in an area known as the old Tea Gardens.

Heavy winds gusting at 70 MPH whipped the flames through parts of the Westmont campus and across Santa Barbara's front-country. The fire chewed through more than 1,900 acres and chased thousands of people from their homes between Hot Springs Road in the Montecito area and Mission Canyon Road in Santa Barbara. 

Fire investigators determined that a smoldering bonfire in the Tea Gardens, lit the night before by a group of trespassing Santa Barbara City College students, sparked the destructive blaze.

The students thought they'd put the bonfire out. 

At the end of the nearly five day firefight, 210 homes were destroyed and nine others were damaged.


Source: http://www.keyt.com/news/santa-barbara-s-county/santa-barbara-marks-ninth-anniversary-of-destructive-tea-fire/656101575


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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