Monday, January 22, 2018

[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (January 22)



2017: Three sequential storms battered SoCal between the 19th and 24th.
Rainfall over the 6-day period reached 10"-13" along the coastal slopes, and 2"-7" along the coast and in coastal valleys.
Snow fell at elevations as low as 4,000 feet with 2'-5' of snow above 5,500 feet and as much as 6' on the highest peaks.
Hundreds of trees were downed along the coast where winds gusted to 50-60 mph.
Palomar Mountain recorded a 93 mph wind gust!

2010:
A very wet and dynamic series of storms started on 1/18/2010 and ended on this day.
Rainfall ranged from 2"-4" in the deserts, to 4"-8" west of the mountains, to 6"-12" on the coastal slopes.
Widespread flooding resulted across the region.
Snowfall of 40"-60" was reported at the higher resorts, with up to 84" at the highest ski resorts.
Some of the worst flash flooding occurred in the high desert on the 1/21/2010 due to the prolonged heavy rainfall.
Scores of homes and several schools sustained damage, and many roads were washed out in Hesperia, Apple Valley, Victorville and Adelanto.
Numerous swift water rescues were needed, one of which likely saved four teens trapped in a storm water drain.
On 1/19/2010 a tornado went through Seal Beach and Huntington Beach causing local damage including boats in Huntington Harbor, and wind gusts reached 60 mph in San Clemente.
Several waterspouts and very strong winds of 93 mph were also reported in Newport Beach and Huntington Beach.
On 1/21/2010 the surface pressure fell to an all-time record low of 29.15" (987.1 mb) at San Diego Lindbergh Field, the lowest since reliable pressure records began in 1880.
Two deaths in Tijuana were attributed to the flooding.
A tree fell onto a mobile home in Lakeside, causing one fatality on 1/19/2010.

2010:
Widespread rain and snow, which began on January 18th, covered the region for a 5 day period with some locations receiving well over the total rainfall received in all of 2009.
For a five day period starting on the 18th, Las Vegas, NV, recorded 1.7" of rain which was greater than the total of 1.59" in all of 2009.

2006:
A Santa Ana wind event brought peak winds from this day to 1.24.
On 1.24 at Fremont Canyon gusts reached 71 mph.
During these days, wind gusts exceeded 60 mph on 19 observations there.
Seven big rigs overturned in Fontana.
Downed power lines and trees caused power outages and property damage.
A roof of a carport was torn off in Hemet.
A dust storm closed Ramona Expressway.

1997: Marin County experienced widespread heavy rainfall with over 3" reported and more than 2" received in 4 hours.
Local flooding occurred in Felton due to a band of heavy showers that moved over the San Lorenzo Mountains.


1996: A storm across Southern California that started on this day and ended on 1.23 brought 12" of snow above 4000 feet.

1988: Strong offshore winds followed a major Pacific storm that started on 1.21 and ended on this day.
Gusts reached 80 mph at the Grapevine and 60 mph in Ontario.
Power poles, road signs and big rigs were knocked down in the Inland Empire.
In San Diego County, roofs were blown off houses, trees were toppled and crops destroyed.
A barn was demolished in Pine Valley.
20 buildings were destroyed or damaged at Viejas.
Avocado and flower crops were destroyed in Fallbrook and Encinitas, respectively.
Five greenhouses were destroyed in Encinitas.
Six were injured in San Diego County from the winds.

1983: A series of storms produced surf up to 16 feet from this day to 1.29 (across Southern California).
Several piers collapsed.
Damage was done to numerous businesses and homes.
Several injuries occurred as people were swept off rocks.

1969:
Heavy rains of tropical origin began on 1.18 ended on 1.28.
As much as 50 inches of rain fell at 7,700 feet.
31" of rain fell on the south slopes of Mt. San Gorgonio, 15..5" at San Jacinto Peak, around 10" at Banning, less than 1" from Indio southeast.
87 were reported dead from flooding and mud slides all over California.
Scores died in traffic accidents.
Hundreds of homes and buildings were destroyed in slides, including 14 destroyed and 11 damaged homes in Mt. Baldy Village.
50 homes near Forest Home (Forest Falls) were damaged by flooding.
Highways and railroads washed out. Power outages occurred.
Cucamonga Creek itself caused $10 million in damage.
The Mojave River took out numerous bridges and flooded farmlands in the upper desert.
Strong storm winds felled trees which killed four and caused power outages.

1967: 30" of snow fell at Tahoe City.

1967: Two back to back storms starting on 1.21 and ending on 1.25 brought 9.24" of precipitation to Lake Arrowhead, 5.46" to Palomar Mountain, 4.86" to Big Bear Lake, 4.24" of rain to San Bernardino, 4.04" to Idyllwild, 2.81" to Santa Ana, and 2.13" to San Diego.
Several roads were flooded and closed for a time.
Heavy snowfall amounted to 24" at Big Bear Lake, 20" at Lake Arrowhead, and 8" at Idyllwild and Palomar Mountain.
Roads were closed for a time..

1962: The heaviest winter storm in 13 years struck the San Bernardino area with 2.93" in Ontario and about two inches in San Bernardino on 1.22 and on this day.
Minor flooding of streets and neighborhoods resulted.
Snow that started on 1.20 and ended on this day reached the lower elevations with two inches in Victorville, Barstow and Yucaipa.
Highways were closed. 27" fell in Big Bear Lake and 24" in Lake Arrowhead over the three days.

1962: Fresno's biggest snow in 32 years: 2.2" fell.
The snow closed schools and caused a rush of people to stores seeking to buy film to photograph this unusual event.
Many roads were slippery and some were closed altogether.
5 people died on Valley roads due to the slick conditions.
Other amounts in the Valley included 4" at Madera, 3" at Wasco, 2" at Hanford, Avenal, Buttonwillow and 1.5" at Los Banos.
The higher elevations were buried in snow: 33" was reported at Badger Pass in Yosemite National Park.

1937: It was 24° F in San Luis Obispo setting a monthly record low.

1937: A massive arctic high built south over the Western US bringing a very cold and dry airmass to the Southern California region.
Temperatures in SoCal tumbled, and all-time record lows were set in Indio (13° F), Palm Springs (10° F), and Newport Beach (29° F).
It was 22° F in Escondido and 19° F in Palm Springs, each the lowest temperature on record.
It was 21° F in Riverside, the lowest temperature recorded in January and the second lowest on record.

1937: Low of 9° F in Las Vegas, NV, froze many pipes. 
The high temperature in Las Vegas was 31° F.
One of only 10 times that the temperature did not climb above the freezing mark.
This also tied for the coldest day ever in Las Vegas with a daily average temperature of 20 degrees. 
Schools had trouble keeping warm and coal was in short supply in the city.

1937: Latest in the year Bakersfield has had a temperature in the teens, low of 19° F.

1937: Carson City, NV reported a morning low of -14° F.

1909: 4.53" of rain fell in San Bernardino on 1.21 and this day.
At Pine Crest (Crestline) 7" fell and at Waterman Canyon 4.11" fell in 24 hours.
Lytle Creek, Waterman Canyon and the Santa Ana River all flooded.
Railroad damage occurred in Mill Creek and Colton.

1890: The morning low temperature at Reno was -9° F.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, Las Vegas, & San Diego

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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Sunday, January 21, 2018

[californiadisasters] Emergency Manager’s Weekly Report 1-19-18



Good Afternoon Everyone,

 

This week's edition is now available at: https://sites.google.com/site/emergencymanagersweeklyreport/

 

Steve Detwiler

EM Weekly Report Editor



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Posted by: Steve Detwiler <steveorange2011@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (January 21)



2012: Strong onshore winds reached 99 mph at Burns Canyon, 66 mph at Palm Springs, and 60 mph at Thermal.
More than 400 trees were blown down, some causing property damage to cars and buildings. Power poles also went down.
Widespread blowing dust inhibited travel and prompted road closures.
A golf
tournament suffered damage.

2010: The final of three strong winter storms moved though the desert southwest, bringing heavy rain, and strong winds to the area, as well as a brief tornado touchdown near the Colorado River in Blythe, CA.
Widespread rain, heavy at times, resulted in numerous flooded streets, and low spots.
Strong winds associated with a line of thunderstorms caused considerable damage to property and some minor injuries.
Phoenix established a new all-time record low pressure of 29.2" on the 21st.
Reference: Service Assessment

2010: A powerful winter storm drops the sea level pressure to an all-time record low of 29.03" in Las Vegas, NV, and also produces a January calendar day record of 0.89".
The strong forcing associated with the storm resulted in up to 1" of snow falling in Summerlin West, NV.
Ice pellets mixed with rain were also observed in Summerlin.

2010:
An extremely strong and deep low pressure system moved over the central California interior and, the all-time record low pressure was reached at both the Bakersfield (KBFL) and Fresno (KFAT) ASOS locations: 28.94" of mercury.
This broke the record of 29.11" set on January 27, 1916 in Fresno.

2010: A very wet and dynamic series of storms started on 1/18/2010 and ended on 1/22/2010.
Rainfall ranged from 2"-4" in the deserts, to 4"-8" west of the mountains, to 6"-12" on the coastal slopes.
Widespread flooding resulted across the region.
Snowfall of 40"-60" was reported at the higher resorts, with up to 84" at the highest ski resorts.
Some of the worst flash flooding occurred in the high desert on this day due to the prolonged heavy rainfall.
Scores of homes and several schools sustained damage, and many roads were washed out in Hesperia, Apple Valley, Victorville and Adelanto.
Numerous swift water rescues were needed, one of which likely saved four teens trapped in a storm water drain.
On 1/19/2010 a tornado went through Seal Beach and Huntington Beach causing local damage including boats in Huntington Harbor, and wind gusts reached 60 mph in San Clemente.
Several waterspouts and very strong winds of 93 mph were also reported in Newport Beach and Huntington Beach.
On this day the surface pressure fell to an all-time record low of 29.15" (987.1 mb) at San Diego Lindbergh Field, the lowest since reliable pressure records began in 1880.
Two deaths in Tijuana were attributed to the flooding.
A tree fell onto a mobile home in Lakeside, causing one fatality on 1/19/2010.

1999: Strong winds in the desert gusted to 80 mph in the Salton Sea area, up to 70 mph in the Coachella Valley, 47 mph in Palm Springs and 36 mph in Thermal.

1991: Winds to 60 mph from Bakersfield to McFarland, with strong winds north to Delano, downing power lines.

1988: Strong offshore winds followed a major Pacific storm that started on this day and ended on 1.22.
Gusts reached 80 mph at the Grapevine and 60 mph in Ontario.
Power poles, road signs and big rigs were knocked down in the Inland Empire.
In San Diego County, six were injured, roofs were blown off houses, trees were toppled and crops destroyed.
A barn was demolished and a garage crushed by a giant tree in Pine Valley.
20 buildings were destroyed or damaged at Viejas.
Avocado and flower crops were destroyed in Fallbrook and Encinitas, respectively.
Five greenhouses were destroyed in Encinitas.
Seven beach swimmers were missing and four were presumed drowned in large surf.
Six were injured in San Diego County from the winds.

1969: Heavy rains of tropical origin began on 1.18 ended on 1.28.
As much as 50" of rain fell at 7,700 feet. 31" of rain fell on the south slopes of Mt. San Gorgonio, 15.5" at San Jacinto Peak, around 10" at Banning, less than 1" from Indio southeast.
87 were reported dead from flooding and mud slides all over California.
Scores died in traffic accidents.
Hundreds of homes and buildings were destroyed in slides, including 14 destroyed and 11 damaged homes in Mt. Baldy Village.
50 homes near Forest Home (Forest Falls) were damaged by flooding.
Highways and railroads washed out. Power outages occurred.
Cucamonga Creek itself caused $10 million in damage.
The Mojave River took out numerous bridges and flooded farmlands in the upper desert.

1967: Two back to back storms starting this day and ending on 1.25 brought 9.24" of precipitation to Lake Arrowhead, 5.46" to Palomar Mountain, 4.86" to Big Bear Lake, 4.24" of rain to San Bernardino, 4.04" to Idyllwild, 2.81"  to Santa Ana, and 2.13" to San Diego.
Several roads were flooded and closed for a time.
Heavy snowfall amounted to 24" at Big Bear Lake, 20" at Lake Arrowhead, and 8" at Idyllwild and Palomar Mountain.
Roads were closed for a time..

1964: F0 tornado moved southwest to northeast in North Fresno for one mile, damaging several homes.

1964: A strong winter storm starting on 1.20 and ending on this day dropped 1.5" of rain on San Bernardino and Redlands and up to 5" in Lake Arrowhead.
A flash flood in Upland damaged a road.
17" of snow fell in Big Bear Lake and Idyllwild.
Heavy snows closed schools and roads.

1962: Ben Lomond set its single day snowfall record of 2".

1962: The heaviest winter storm in 13 years struck the San Bernardino area with 2.93" in Ontario and about 2" in San Bernardino on this day and on 1.22.
Minor flooding of streets and neighborhoods resulted.
Snow that started on 1.20 and ended on this day reached the lower elevations with 2" in Victorville, Barstow and Yucaipa.
27" fell in Big Bear Lake and 24" in Lake Arrowhead over the three days.
Highways were closed.

1949: At least 1" of snow was on the ground for a record 12 days in a row in Las Vegas,NV.
The duration of the snow and cold prompted a State of Emergency by the Governor and rescue squads searched for stranded miners in Clark County.
25% percent of the cattle in southern Nevada died and total agricultural damages in the 4 southern Nevada counties and White Pine County were $5 million.

1943: Reno, NV recorded 2.29" of precipitation, its second largest one-day total ever.

1937: Latest in the year that Fresno has had a low temperature in the teens, reading of 19° F.
Huntington Lake bottomed out at -18° F, coldest ever there; Yosemite Valley tied its' coldest low ever of -6° F.

1937: Snow flurries fell at San Diego.
Trace amounts stuck to northern and eastern parts of the city.

1937: Carson City, NV reported a morning low of -27° F, its all-time record low temperature.

1937:
The high temperature in Las Vegas was 28° F.
This tied the record for the coldest high temperature ever recorded and was one of only three times that the high temperature remained in the 20s.

1916: Widespread heavy rains hit Southern California starting on 1.14 and ending on this day. 8.5" fell during this period in San Bernardino.
16.71" fell in 24 hours at Squirrel Inn (near Lake Arrowhead) on 1.16 and on 1.17, a record 24 hour rainfall for California until 1943.
More than 9" fell in two storms in the Coachella Valley.
Previous storms had deposited deep snow in the mountains, adding to the runoff.
Widespread flooding resulted and at least 22 died.
Roofs in Chula Vista, poultry farm in Vista, boats in Coronado and Newport were damaged.
Most cities were completely inundated.
Pine trees from Palomar Mountain floated down the San Luis Rey River through Oceanside.
The cities of Indio, Coachella and Mecca were underwater.
Ontario and Redlands were isolated and roads, railroads and bridges were washed out.

1916: Reno, NV's morning low was -17° F.

1909: 4.53" of rain fell in San Bernardino on this day and 1.22.
At Pine Crest (Crestline) 7" fell and at Waterman Canyon 4.11" fell in 24 hours..
Lytle Creek, Waterman Canyon and the Santa Ana River all flooded.
Railroad damage occurred in Mill Creek and Colton.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey,, Hanford, Reno, Las Vegas, Phoenix, & San Diego

--


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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Saturday, January 20, 2018

[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (January 20)



2010: 61 mph wind gust (from SE) and 48 mph sustained wind speed (from S) reported at Merced Macready Field Airport (KMCE ASOS) due to an extremely strong low pressure system moving onshore.
Roof damage and trees down throughout much of the San Joaquin Valley were reported this day.

2010: A very wet and dynamic series of storms started on 1/18/2010 and ended on 1/22/2010.
Rainfall ranged from 2"-4" in the deserts, to 4"-8" west of the mountains, to 6"-12" on the coastal slopes.
Widespread flooding resulted across the region.
Snowfall of 40"-60" inches was reported at the higher resorts, with up to seven feet at the highest ski resorts.
Some of the worst flash flooding occurred in the high desert on the 1/21/2010 due to the prolonged heavy rainfall.
Scores of homes and several schools sustained damage, and many roads were washed out in Hesperia, Apple Valley, Victorville and Adelanto.
Numerous swift water rescues were needed, one of which likely saved four teens trapped in a storm water drain.
On 1/19/2010 a tornado went through Seal Beach and Huntington Beach causing local damage including boats in Huntington Harbor, and wind gusts reached 60 mph in San Clemente.
Several waterspouts and very strong winds of 93 mph were also reported in Newport Beach and Huntington Beach.
On 1/21/2010 the surface pressure fell to an all-time record low of 29.15"  (987.1 mb) at San Diego Lindbergh Field, the lowest since reliable pressure records began in 1880.
Two deaths in Tijuana were attributed to the flooding.
A tree fell onto a mobile home in Lakeside, causing one fatality on 1/19/2010.

1999:
The morning low temperature of 58° F in Las Vegas, NV, set the all-time warmest January low.

1997: An F0 tornado touched down near Exeter damaging roofs and knocking down trees.

1987: Santa Ana type wind gusts reached 80 mph below Cajon Pass, 70 mph in San Bernardino, 60 mph at Mt. Laguna and 40 mph in El Toro.
Trucks were blown over, thick dust clouds developed, and trees were downed.
A hundred power poles went down in the Inland Empire causing numerous power outages.
Schools closed in Fontana as a result of power outages.
A mobile classroom was knocked over.
Brush fires were started.

1982: A tornado hit Riverside.

1976: It was 85° F at Pismo Beach, setting a monthly record.

1971: Warmest ever in January at Edwards AFB, temperature reached 82° F for a high.

1969: Heavy rains of tropical origin began on 1.18 ended on 1.28.
As much as 50" of rain fell at 7,700 feet. 31" of rain fell on the south slopes of Mt. San Gorgonio, 15.5" at San Jacinto Peak, around 10" at Banning, less than 1" from Indio southeast.
87 were reported dead from flooding and mud slides all over California.
Scores died in traffic accidents.
Hundreds of homes and buildings were destroyed in slides, including 14 destroyed and 11 damaged homes in Mt. Baldy Village.
50 homes near Forest Home (Forest Falls) were damaged by flooding.
Highways and railroads washed out.
Power outages occurred.
Cucamonga Creek itself caused $10 million in damage..
The Mojave River took out numerous bridges and flooded farmlands in the upper desert.

1962: Snow that started on this day and ended on 1.22 reached the lower elevations.
Highways were closed.
27" fell in Big Bear Lake and 24" in Lake Arrowhead over the three days.

1937: The Pinnacles National Monument only hit 36° F making it the lowest high temperature ever recorded there.

1937: Yuma, AZ, sets their all time record low of 22° F.
This record is tied in 1883 and again in 1911.

1937: Boca, California (near Truckee), reported a morning low temperature of -45° F, still the all-time record low for the state of California.

1916: Widespread heavy rains hit Southern California starting on 1.14 and ending on 1.21.
8.5" fell during this period in San Bernardino.
16.71" fell in 24 hours at Squirrel Inn (near Lake Arrowhead) on 1.16 and on 1.17, a record 24 hour rainfall for California until 1943.
More than 9" fell in two storms in the Coachella Valley.
Previous storms had deposited deep snow in the mountains, adding to the runoff.
Widespread flooding resulted and at least 22 died.
Roofs in Chula Vista, poultry farm in Vista, boats in Coronado and Newport were damaged.
Most cities were completely inundated.
Pine trees from Palomar Mountain floated down the San Luis Rey River through Oceanside.
The cities of Indio, Coachella and Mecca were underwater.
Ontario and Redlands were isolated and roads, railroads and bridges were washed out.

1911: Yuma, AZ, sets their all time record low of 22° F.
This record is tied in 1883 and again in 1937

1883: Yuma, AZ, sets their all time record low of 22° F.
This record is tied in 1911 and again in 1937.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey,, Hanford, Reno, Phoenix, & San Diego

--


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] Names of Montecito mudslide victims released



Names of Montecito mudslide victims released


The names of the 21 victims killed in flooding and mudslides in Montecito have been released by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office.

The victims range in age from 3 years old to 89; all were residents of Montecito.

The cause of death for most of the individuals was listed as "Multiple traumatic injuries due to flash flood with mudslides due to recent wildfire."

The names were released following the notification of next of kin.

"The Sheriff's Office wants to express our heartfelt sadness to the family and friends of those who lost their loved ones," the agency said in a statement. "We request that you respect their privacy during this most difficult time."

Four people are still considered to be "actively missing, sheriff's officials said.

Here are the names of the deceased:

Faviola Benitez, 28

Jonathan Benitez, age 10

Kailly Benitez, 3

Joseph Francis Bleckel, 87

Martin Cabrera-Munoz, 48

David Cantin, 49

Morgan Christine Corey, 25

Sawyer Corey, 12

Peter Fleurat, 73

Josephine Gower, 69

John McManigal, 61

Alice Mitchell, 78

James Mitchell, 89

Mark Montgomery, 54

Caroline Montgomery, 22

Marilyn Ramos, 27

Rebecca Riskin, 61

Roy Rohter, 84

Peerawat Sutthithepa, 6

Pinit Sutthithepa, 30

Richard Taylor, 67

Here's what we know about the victims so far:

JOSEPHINE "JOSIE" GOWER, 69:

Gower's home was inundated by knee-deep mud and large boulders carried by the force of the mudslides. The home's garage was destroyed and the cars were swept away.

Her friend Doug Scott told ABC News that Gower and another friend were on the second floor of her home but ventured downstairs when they heard rumbling. They were swept away by the mud, but the friend was rescued by clinging to a tree near the house, Scott said.

"Why didn't she stay upstairs?" Hayden Gower asked, tearfully. "Why did she go downstairs?"

Josie Gower's friend Diane Brewer said she used to live next door to the now-destroyed property. The two had traveled to Italy for five weeks with Josie's children last year.

REBECCA RISKIN, 61:

Riskin was a real estate agent and founder of Riskin Partners.

"It is with heavy hearts we share that our dear friend and partner, Rebecca Riskin, has passed away as a result of the tragic flooding and mudslides in Montecito," the company wrote in a Facebook post. "The confirmation of her loss is incredibly devastating to her friends, family, and our community."

"Rebecca was an exceptional woman, and her legacy will continue to live on and thrive through her children, Robert and Julia, her husband Ken Grand, and her namesake firm, Riskin Partners."

Colleagues at Riskin Partners credited the former ballerina with having closed more than $2 billion in high-end real estate sales since founding the company that bears her name in the early 1990s.

"She's leaving a huge void. She was exceptional," said Gina Conte, who described Riskin as her best friend, mentor and confidante.

Conte said Riskin, who was the maid of honor at her wedding, took joy in pairing the perfect home with the perfect family and loved cooking, going for long walks and spending movie nights with her family.

Riskin was swept away after a mudslide tore through her living room, Conte said, adding that her husband survived because he was in bed in a part of the house that stayed intact. Her body was found Wednesday near a highway.

Company spokeswoman Erin Lammers said Riskin was a ballerina with the American Ballet Theater in New York before an injury cut short her dancing career. She returned to her hometown of Los Angeles in 1979, where she began selling high-end real estate on the city's west side. She moved to Montecito in the early 1990s.

Riskin is survived by her husband, two grown children and a grandson.
ROY ROHTER, 84:

Rohter founded St. Augustine Academy in Ventura in 1994 and was described as a man dedicated to his Catholic faith and to helping others. The mudslide swept Rohter and his wife Theresa Rohter out of their home. Theresa was rescued and hospitalized in stable condition.

The school posted a statement about Rohter on Facebook.

The school's headmaster, Michael Van Hecke, a friend of Rohter for more than 25 years, said: "Roy's life has been in service to his good, loving and ever-forgiving God. He has done so much for so many people and pro-life and Catholic education causes. ... Thousands have been blessed by the Rohters' friendship and generosity."

Rohter grew up in Chicago and was a real estate broker for several years before founding St. Augustine Academy.
Even as the names were released, the search was continuing for other survivors and victims.

Search teams were methodically combing the rubble and debris left by the mudslides with the help of trained K-9s.

PINIT AND PEERAWAT SUTTHITHEPA, RICHARD TAYLOR:

Pinit - known as "Peanut" to friends - immigrated to the United States from Thailand, according to a family friend.

He initially came by himself, sending money back to his wife and two children before they were able to immigrate as well by 2016.

They only had a short time together as a reunited family.

The Thomas Fire forced them to evacuate their home last month.

Then the powerful rainstorm that swept through Montecito and brought massive mudslides took the lives of Pinit and his 6-year-old son Peerawat.

His daughter Lydia, 2, remains on the list of the missing.

His father-in-law Richard Loring Taylor was also killed in the mudslides.

Source: http://abc7.com/names-of-montecito-victims-released/2930517/


__._,_.___

Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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Please join our Discussion Group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/californiadisasters_discussion/ for topical but extended discussions started here or for less topical but nonetheless relevant messages.





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Friday, January 19, 2018

[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (January 19)



2014: Strong high pressure brought downsloping winds that allowed maximum temperatures to reach record highs across much of the San Joaquin Valley.

2010:
 Strong winds brought trees and power lines down at numerous locations in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 


2010:
The second in a series of powerful winter storms, which began on 1/18/2010 and ended on 1/22/2010) arrived in SoCal, bringing with it a strong Pacific front and thunderstorms.
Rainfall ranged from 2"-4" in the deserts, to 4"-8" west of the mountains, to 6"-12" on the coastal slopes. 
Widespread flooding resulted across the region. 
Snowfall of 40"-60" was reported at the higher resorts, with up to seven feet at the highest ski resorts. 
Some of the worst flash flooding occurred in the high desert on the 1/21/2010 due to the prolonged heavy rainfall. 
Scores of homes and several schools sustained damage, and many roads were washed out in Hesperia, Apple Valley, Victorville and Adelanto. 
Numerous swift water rescues were needed, one of which likely saved four teens trapped in a storm water drain.
Thunderstorms were particularly strong in Orange County, with peak wind gusts of 93 and 92 mph measured at Newport Beach and Huntington Beach Piers.
Numerous 60-70 mph gusts were reported in surrounding areas.
The storms spawned an EF1 tornado in Sunset Beach that damaged boats in Huntington Harbor and flipped at least one vehicle.

On
this day a tornado went through Seal Beach and Huntington Beach causing local damage including boats in Huntington Harbor, and wind gusts reached 60 mph in San Clemente. 

Several waterspouts and very strong winds of 93 mph were also reported in Newport Beach and Huntington Beach. 
On 1/21/2010 the surface pressure fell to an all-time record low of 29.15" (987.1 mb) at San Diego Lindbergh Field, the lowest since reliable pressure records began in 1880. 
Two deaths in Tijuana were attributed to the flooding.. 
A tree fell onto a mobile home in Lakeside, causing one fatality on this day.

1993:
One of, if not the, most dreary period(s) in SoCal history came to an end on this day when the region recorded its 14th consecutive day of measurable precipitation (the most on record). The rain reports during this period weren't isolated either, with Alpine, Big Bear Lake, Escondido, Newport Beach, Riverside, and Santa Ana all getting in on the 14-day streak.
This day marked the end of seven consecutive days (the most on record) of measurable precipitation in Victorville, which started on 1.13. 
This also occurred on 2.18-24.2005, 2.14-20.1980, and 12.22-28.1971.

1971: It was 90° F in Borrego Springs, the highest temperature on record for January.

1969: Heavy rains of tropical origin began on 1.18 ended on 1.28. As much as 50" of rain fell at 7,700 feet. 
31" of rain fell on the south slopes of Mt. San Gorgonio, 15.5" at San Jacinto Peak, around 10" at Banning, less than 1" from Indio southeast. 
This day was the start of nine consecutive days (the most on record) of measurable precipitation in Riverside which ended on 1.27. 
This also occurred on 2.13-2.21.1980. 
This day also marked the start of 11 consecutive days (the most on record) of measurable precipitation in Palomar Mountain, which ended on 1.29. 
87 were reported dead from flooding and mud slides all over California
Scores died in traffic accidents. Hundreds of homes and buildings were destroyed in slides, including 14 destroyed and 11 damaged homes in Mt. Baldy Village. 
50 homes near Forest Home (Forest Falls) were damaged by flooding. 
Highways and railroads washed out. 
Power outages occurred. Cucamonga Creek itself caused $10 million in damage. 
The Mojave River took out numerous bridges and flooded farmlands in the upper desert.

1954: Heavy rain "averaged" about 3" around Upland and Rancho Cucamonga and more than 4" in the mountains on 1.18 and on this day. 
Floods and debris flows struck these communities and blocked or damaged roads. 
Debris flows at least ten feet deep in Arcadia nearly killed people and large boulders smashed into homes. 
These debris flows followed wildfires in the San Gabriel Mountains.

1949: The high temperature of 46° F in Santa Ana was the lowest high temperature on record, also occurring on 1.14.1949 and 2.23.1953.

1943:
Las Vegas, NV, recorded a low temperature of 10° F, setting a daily record.

1937: Portola reported a morning low of -22° F.

1933: Bakersfield's wettest January day on record, 1.57" of precipitation fell.

1933: 15" of snow fell at Carson City, NV, with 10.5" of snow being reported at Reno, NV.

1916: Widespread heavy rains hit Southern California starting on 1.14 and ending on 1.21. 8.5" fell during this period in San Bernardino. 
16.71" fell in 24 hours at Squirrel Inn (near Lake Arrowhead) on 1.16 and on 1.17, a record 24 hour rainfall for California until 1943. 
More than 9" fell in two storms in the Coachella Valley. 
Previous storms had deposited deep snow in the mountains, adding to the runoff. 
Widespread flooding resulted and at least 22 died. 
Roofs in Chula Vista, poultry farm in Vista, boats in Coronado and Newport were damaged. 
Most cities were completely inundated. 
Pine trees from Palomar Mountain floated down the San Luis Rey River through Oceanside. 
The cities of Indio, Coachella and Mecca were underwater. 
Ontario and Redlands were isolated and roads, railroads and bridges were washed out.

1916: Following several days of rain, including a "heavy downpour" of 1.10" on the 18th, strong winds blew down over 400 oil derricks near Bakersfield.

1913: The biggest rain, wind and storm in the Sacramento Valley came to an end after tying up railroad traffic nearly 24 hours. 
Redding rainfall to date was 19.19". 
The previous year it was 7.10".

1913: The morning low at Truckee was -26° F.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, Las Vegas, & San Diego and the Redding Record-Searchlight

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[Volcano_Vista_HS] VVHS...needs our help!



PARENT VOLUNTEERS NEEDED


IN ORDER TO KEEP VOLCANO VISTA SAFE AND LOOKING GREAT, WE WOULD LIKE TO HAVE PARENT VOLUNTEERS WALK THE HALLS BETWEEN 2:45 AND 6:00 PM MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAYS.   THE JOB WILL ONLY REQUIRE WALKING AND REPORTING ANY ACTIVITY TO THE ADMINISTRATION VIA RADIO OR TEXT AND NOT TO ENGAGE OR DEAL WITH SITUATIONS.  ONLY REPORTING.  A BACKGROUND CHECK WILL BE REQUIRED BY APS.  IF YOU ARE INTERESTED, PLEASE CONTACT MANUEL ALZAGA AT 313.1313 OR AT manuel.alzaga@aps.edu


Thank you,




Manuel Hernandez Alzaga
Vice Principal, Volcano Vista HS
(US Army Veteran 1981 -1992)

"WHO - RAH HAWKS!!"




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Posted by: grangergang@ymail.com


For more information, go to our web site: http://www.volcanovistahawks.com




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